don't rely on luck to keep your
corned beef safe

Two unrelated outbreaks in the states of Virginia and Ohio set a precedence of the importance of excellent food safety practices to prevent the growth of C.perfringens. The outbreaks affected over 271 people and were linked to improper cooling, reheating and hot holding practices of corned beef, eaten in celebration of St. Patrick's Day. 
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  7. Don't Rely on Luck to Keep Your Corned Beef Safe

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Don't rely on luck to keep your corned beef safe

Two unrelated outbreaks in the states of Virginia and Ohio set a precedence of the importance of excellent food safety practices to prevent the growth of C.perfringens. The outbreaks affected over 271 people and were linked to improper cooling, reheating and hot holding practices of corned beef, eaten in celebration of St. Patrick's Day. 

The facts about Clostridium perfringens

C. perfringens are bacteria most commonly present on meat and poultry. Improper cold and hot holding, as well as improper reheating and cooling can cause a C. perfringens intoxication. Symptoms are abdominal cramping and diarrhea approximately 6-24 hours after ingestion.  

We suggest having these tools and processes in place in your restaurant to reduce the risk of a C. perfringens intoxication.  

  • Always have an easily accessible, working and properly calibrated thermometer on hand
  • Hold food at the proper holding temperatures: < 41°f="" for="" cold="" food="" and="">135° F for hot food
  • Cool food from 135° F to 70° F within 2 hours and from 70° F to < 41°="" f="" within="" an="" additional="" 4="" hours="">
  • Train and refresh proper procedures of holding, reheating and cooling
  • Verify holding, cooking and reheating temperatures frequently

The 2017 Food Code added descriptive wording around the duty requirements of the Person in Charge (PIC). The PIC shall ensure routine monitoring of food temperatures during hot and cold holding.

Source: Center for Disease Control
Image: CC BY-SA 3.0Link

 

 

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